Middle Neighborhoods

Our neighborhoods compete for people. One of my main priorities in Congress is putting America’s Middle Neighborhoods back on top. Middle Neighborhoods are communities on the edge of growth and decline. Middle neighborhoods are areas that are doing just well enough. We are not focusing as much resources or attention on these neighborhoods because we have yet to see an increased need to invest in these areas. However, if we aren’t careful these neighborhoods will teeter towards decline overnight.

Middle Neighborhoods have four main characteristics: neighborhoods where homeowners can purchase real estate for an affordable rate, neighborhoods where crime rates are low, neighborhoods where school performance is sufficient, and neighborhoods where employment rates are adequate. Essentially, homebuyers in middle neighborhoods are willing to test the odds with the hopes that their neighborhood will improve rather than decline.

In Philadelphia, over 40 percent of the population lives in middle neighborhoods. When talking about middle neighborhoods in Pennsylvania’s Second Congressional District we are referring to: Mt. Airy, Germantown, West Oak Lane, Roxborough, and Wynnefield.

I know firsthand what is at stake for America’s Middle Neighborhoods. I grew up in North Philly and today I live in West Oak Lane just blocks away from Germantown High School, my alma mater. As your Representative in Congress I will continue to support policies that make our neighborhoods stronger, block by block. 

For more information about my work on Middle Neighborhoods, please contact my office.

 

Today, Congresswoman Cheri Bustos (IL-17) introduced the Addiction Recovery for Rural Communities (ARRC) Act, a bipartisan bill that will help rural communities bolster their efforts to fight the opioid and addiction epidemic. Joining Congresswoman Bustos to lead the legislation in the House are Representatives Rick Crawford (AR-01), Roger Marshall (KS-01) and Dwight Evans (PA-02) – all fellow members of the House Agriculture Committee. Senators Joe Donnelly (D-IN), Luther Strange (R-AL) and Pat Roberts (R-KS) also introduced companion legislation in the U.S. Senate.

Today, Congressman Dwight Evans (Philadelphia and Montgomery County) testified before Philadelphia City Council’s Hearing of the Committee on Legislative Oversight. Councilman Kenyatta Johnson is the chair of the committee. The hearing, “Examining Racial Disparities In Home Lending, Also Known As Modern-Day Red-lining” was a chance for Congressman Evans to speak out against the harmful practice of predatory lending.

Today, Congressman Dwight Evans (PA-02) was thrilled to announce that on behalf of the City Council of Philadelphia, Mayor Jim Kenney and Councilwoman Jannie Blackwell have introduced a resolution to express their support for School Modernization and School Rehabilitation through their resolution which shows their strong support for Congressman Evans’ bill H.R. 922, the Rehabilitation of Historic Schools Act of 2017 and its companion legislation, Senate Bill 1156.

Congressman Dwight Evans (PA-02); Ranking Member of the House Judiciary Committee, Jerrold Nadler (NY-10); Pennsylvania Attorney General, Josh Shapiro; Philadelphia District Attorney, Larry Krasner; Chief Defender of the Defender Association of Philadelphia, Keir Grey; Chairman of the Pennsylvania Legislative Black Caucus, Rep.

What do countries, states and neighborhoods have in common? People. They all compete for people.

Through people, you get innovators, investors, builders, developers, thinkers. Through people, you have the building blocks of your workforce.

Our neighborhoods rely on anchors like great schools, bustling shops and small businesses, and a competitive housing stock in order to attract homebuyers and increase long-term homeownership.

Today, Congressman Bob Brady (PA-01), Congressman Brendan Boyle (PA-13), Congressman Dwight Evans (PA-02), Mayor Jim Kenney, City Council President Darrell L. Clarke, Councilwoman Jannie L. Blackwell and Sister Mary Scullion joined together at Project HOME’s Ruth Williams House at the Gene & Marlene Epstein Building, to highlight the need for federal funding to support critical safety net programs including: affordable housing, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), and education programs that are under attack in the Trump budget.

Pages